Kishōtenketsu Stages

Stages:

The four basic stages of the Kishōtenketsu story structure are:

1. Introduction (Ki)
Description of characters and/or place. Create the setting of the story.

2. Development (Sho)
Description of event(s) that lead to the twist. Major changes do not occur.

3. Twist (Ten)
A new unforeseen and unheralded event that sheds a different light on the previous events and makes the reader or viewer question any conclusions they may have formed so far. This is the crux or climax of a Kishōtenketsu narrative. Anglo cultures might call this a curve ball.

4. Conclusion (Ketsu)
Kishōtenketsu narratives often end without resolution; questions still remain. The story concludes by bringing together several disparate ideas to prompt listeners to consider possible resolutions.

Stages

The four basic stages of the Kishōtenketsu story structure are:
1. Introduction (Ki)
Description of characters and/or place. Create the setting of the story.
2. Development (Sho) Description of event(s) that lead to the twist. Major...
Example

An interesting Western example to apply the Kishōtenketsu story structure to is Kate Chopin’s The Story of an Hour (1894). In Chopin’s short story, considered unconventional when published, the reader becomes an intimate witness to Louise’s inner emotional struggle upon learning that she...
Learning Applications

When to apply this structure:
To recognize or use this structure, look for a series of seemingly unrelated events that are suddenly tied together by a plot twist. Often the feeling a Western reader or viewer has when unknowingly encountering Kishōtenketsu is mild confusion or...